Georgetown, Maine

US Harbors is hosting a free, online conference with internationally renowned experts speaking on key aspects of rising coastal water levels. The purpose of the event is to help communities understand what is happening–and predicted to happen–with rising water-levels and learn about how to track, and plan for, these conditions.


EVENT DATE/TIME: November 17, 2021, from 1-4pm EST
LOCATION: Online, registration required.


REGISTER HERE


SPEAKERS INCLUDE:
  • John Englander, renowned author (High Tide on Main Street, and
    Moving to Higher Ground), oceanographer, international speaker, and
    expert on climate change and sea level rise. https://johnenglander.net
  • Renee Collini leads Place: SLR, a multi-state network of stakeholders,
    researchers, NGOs, and state and federal agencies to build tools and
    programs to address gaps in sea-level rise observing, research, and
    decision-making in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Collini is an author on
    the Fifth National Climate Assessment’s Coastal Effects Chapter.
  • David Wolcott, senior oceanographer with NOAA, specializing in tide
    and coastal water level monitoring technologies and predictions.
  • Anastasia Fischer, President, US Harbors started US Harbors’ program
    to get affordable, easy to maintain, hyper-local tide stations into communities that currently lack this critical data.
  • Breakout Session #1: New Solutions for Affordable Hyper-Local Tide & Sea-Level Monitoring
  • Breakout Session #2: Models for Community Engagement

Click on image to download the 2018 Trails Guide, or pick up a copy at the Town Office.

(click on image to download)

And click here for 2018 update:

Coastal Guide

(click on image to download)

Seasonal Notices

Reminder:  Deer Ticks May Be Out Whenever There’s No Snow Cover

Forty percent of deer ticks in our area carry one or more tick borne diseases, and the tick population has been increasing dramatically.  Nymph deer ticks are tiny and hungry and most active in early spring.  Be careful out there.  FMI see our resource section on Tick Borne Diseases

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